Wednesday, April 23, 2014

When Should I Replace My Running Shoes?


An old pair of running shoes can feel a lot like an old friend. The shoes have been so many places with you - right there with you on so many memorable runs. However, if you hang onto your favorite pair of running shoes for too long, you could injure yourself.

Nothing quite beats the feeling of that first run in a fresh, new pair of running shoes. It almost feels as if you could run forever. Unfortunately, all running shoes will eventually lose their cushioning ability.  When this happens,  the stress to the feet and legs is increased dramatically. Over time, this additional stress can contribute to the onset of an overuse injury. So, how do you know when to replace your running shoes? Unfortunately, there is no universal answer to this question.

As a general rule of thumb, you should replace your running shoes between 300 - 500 miles. There are a variety of factors that contribute to the lifespan of your shoes. The construction of the shoe, your physical composition, the surface on which you run, your running style and your running climate are all variables to consider in how often you replace your shoes. The Shoe Replacement Chart can help you determine how long your running shoes may last.


Look for obvious signs of wear and tear to your shoes but do not rely only on how the outsole of your shoe looks to determine if it needs to be replaced. Most importantly, listen to your body. Little aches and pains may begin to arise. You may not be injured, but your body is certainly talking to you. It's probably telling you that your shoes need to be changed.

If you're still not sure if you should replace your shoes - go to your local running store and try on a fresh, new pair of your favorite training shoes side by side with your current pair. It will probably be pretty clear. For example, you may feel higher off of the ground in the new pair, if the midsole in the old pair is compressed beyond repair.

Disclaimer:
There is a fine line between blogging and giving medical advice. The content of this blog is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as medical advice.  Nothing contained in this blog is intended to replace the medical advice of a trained, licensed physician.
In all matters relating to your health, you are urged to consult a physician. You can contact Advanced Bone & Joint to set up a formal consultation appointment with Dr. W. Anthony Frisella, Dr. Dane Glueck, Dr. Brandon Larkin, Dr. Anthony Lombardo, Dr. John McAllister, II, Dr. Brian Meek, Dr. Paul Spezia, Jennifer Eickhoff, FNP-BC, or Matt Pliske, PA-C


Monday, April 21, 2014

Marathon Monday: What Is Runner's Knee?



The term “runner’s knee” is a catch – all phrase associated with pain around the knee and running. Runner's knee is also called anterior knee pain and patellofemoral pain syndrome – which means there is pain around the general area of the patella (your kneecap) and your femur (your leg bone). The word “syndrome” means there are different factors contributing to the pain.

Runner's knee is the most common running injury. It accounts for approximately 20% of all running injuries.  This injury impacts not only runners, but also jumpers and cyclists. The symptom most associated with runner's knee is a dull ache/pain below the kneecap that may be mild at first and only experienced during running activities. As training continues, the pain becomes progressively more intense during running and also the pain can increasingly be felt while at rest.



The good news about runner's knee is that it's a relatively minor condition. It is really just chronic failure of tissues within the knee to completely recover from running-induced damage in between runs.   The bad news is that is can be just as debilitating and last as long as more serious knee breakdowns.
  
The best treatment for Runner’s Knee is prevention! Prevention involves the use of proper footwear, proper running form and regular stretching. When runner's knee does occur, it often responds well to  RICE Treatment.  It is very important to listen to your body. If it hurts, your body is trying to tell you to stop doing what you are doing and rest a bit. 

If you are experiencing the symptoms of runner's knee, you can do rehabilitation exercises at home to assist in your successful recovery from this type of injury.   If you experience persistent pain in the front or outside of your knee, an evaluation with an orthopedic doctor is warranted.  An accurate diagnosis can be made through a combination of your history, physical exams and imaging studies.  Contact Advanced Bone & Joint and our sports medicine specialists can provide you with a prompt, thorough evaluation  for your knee injury



The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
Disclaimer:
There is a fine line between blogging and giving medical advice. The content of this blog is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as medical advice.  Nothing contained in this blog is intended to replace the medical advice of a trained, licensed physician.
In all matters relating to your health, you are urged to consult a physician. You can contact Advanced Bone & Joint to set up a formal consultation appointment with Dr. W. Anthony Frisella, Dr. Dane Glueck, Dr. Brandon Larkin, Dr. Anthony Lombardo, Dr. John McAllister, II, Dr. Brian Meek, Dr. Paul Spezia, Jennifer Eickhoff, FNP-BC, or Matt Pliske, PA-C.
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99
The good news about patellofemoral pain syndrome is that it’s a relatively minor condition. Indeed, it’s really just a chronic failure of tissues within the knee to fully recovery from running-induced damage between runs. The bad news is that it can be just as debilitating and last just as long as more serious breakdowns.
Read more at http://running.competitor.com/2014/02/injury-prevention/beating-runners-knee_143#2Rcf2od5ZEl3mbQF.99

Friday, April 18, 2014

New Documentary Follows St. Charles Runner / ABJ Patient Through His Journey From The 2013 Boston Marathon Bombing To The 2014 Race

Karen and Howard Mayes of St. Charles, Missouri

5 Runners is a documentary that profiles the personal journeys of five runners who were nearing the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon when the first bomb exploded. This documentary follows up with each runner on their missions to return to Boston and race the 2014 marathon on April 21st.  A follow-up to this documentary will be filmed this summer.

Howard Mayes, from St. Charles Missouri, was touching the finish line when the first bomb exploded - only twenty yards away.  Fortunately, Howard was not physically hurt and neither was his wife, Karen, who was waiting for him near the finish line.

Howard visited with Advanced Bone & Joint's Sports Medicine Specialist,  Dr. Larkin, on March 3rd, 2014 to discuss any physical issues that would make it impossible for Howard to run in the 2014 Marathon. (See Howard's visit with Dr. Larkin: 18:29).

Unfortunately, Howard Mayes is unable to run the 2014 Boston Marathon due to physical setbacks related to his foot and knee. So this year, the roles of distance runner and spectator will be reversed. Howard's wife, Karen Mayes, the Director of Nursing Education at St. Louis Community College, will participate in the 118th running of the Marathon after receiving an invitational entry from the Boston Athletic Association to take Howard's place.

We will keep up with Karen as she completes the Boston Marathon this Monday. The race will be broadcast nationally on Universal Sports, and online at UniversalSports.com.

Photo of Mary, Howard, Demi, Volker & Brian just before the first bomb detonated.

Disclaimer:
There is a fine line between blogging and giving medical advice. The content of this blog is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as medical advice.  Nothing contained in this blog is intended to replace the medical advice of a trained, licensed physician.
In all matters relating to your health, you are urged to consult a physician. You can contact Advanced Bone & Joint to set up a formal consultation appointment with Dr. W. Anthony Frisella, Dr. Dane Glueck, Dr. Brandon Larkin, Dr. Anthony Lombardo, Dr. John McAllister, II, Dr. Brian Meek, Dr. Paul Spezia, Jennifer Eickhoff, FNP-BC, or Matt Pliske, PA-C.

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

April Showers!




April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month! This month is the month of April Showers and Advanced Bone & Joint is collecting donation items for The Crisis Nursery. We are collecting everything you can imagine and we are collecting throughout the whole month of April!  

 Below is a suggested list of items you can donate.

The Crisis Nursery Wish List:
Art paint, 
Play Dough - especially the multicultural dough

Model Magic
craft kits and model kits for older boys

Multicultural shades of construction paper

Size 4, 5, 6 diapers and pull-ups
Wipes

High Efficiency laundry detergent
dish soap

Size AA, AAA, C, D and 9V batteries

Lotion
bubble bath, baby wash
Disney or other Children’s DVDs rated G or PG

Clothing in sizes 3T-16/18
new underwear and socks


Dress up clothes for boys and girls

Plastic spoons and forks
Paper plates
Sippy cups
Paper towels

Lysol Wipes,
Swiffer cleaning pads and cleaner, laminate floor cleaner, kitchen trash bags
Culturally diverse Barbie & Ken dolls, Dolls (boys and girls) doll clothing

Mega Blocks or Legos
Matchbox Cars & Trucks
musical & light-up toys

Coats and shoes for school aged children
Gloves

Toys (especially for children ages 8-12)

Hair products for African American children

Nintendo DS system

Cereal & Snacks
Enfamil with Lipil (or store brand milk based)

Fruit juice,
canned fruit & vegetables,
canned pasta (ravioli, spaghetti & meatballs)

peanut butter, jelly, macaroni & cheese



Gift Certificates to Shop N Save, Save-A-Lot, Wal-Mart, Target, K-Mart Quik Trip Gas Cards.
Bus Tickets (Available for purchase from Schnuck’sCustomer Service) are always very much appreciated.Please remember that these are just suggestions. We do ask however, that you not donate any violent or war-related items.

The Crisis Nursery is a wonderful organization committed to the prevention of child abuse and neglect. The Crisis Nursery provides emergency intervention, respite and support to families in crisis. Here are a few things they do for children and families in need in our community:

    Short-term care for young children in a safe and nurturing environment
    Helping families resolve crisis
    Offering resources for empowerment, ongoing support and parent education.
    Community outreach and awareness
    Advocacy for children and families.


That '80s Run at St. Charles Community College




“Run. Live. Learn.”  has a new name - That ‘80s Run!  This year, the event is coming to St. Charles Community College on Saturday April 26th, 2014.  That ‘80s Run is a community event that features three runs (10k, 5k, and 1-mile Fun Run) and a FREE Health and Wellness expo on race day. Exciting!

Come join Advanced Bone & Joint for a day of community fitness and education at the Health and Wellness Expo of That ‘80s Run! This event is presented by the RUN. LIVE. LEARN Committee at St. Charles Community College. Proceeds from this event will help fund college wellness projects.

Awards and Prizes
Entrants in the 5k and 10k races will be automatically entered into a drawing to win a $1000.00 scholarship to St. Charles Community College. $50.00 cash prizes will also be awarded to the first overall men’s and women’s finishers in the 5k race. More than 100 trophies will be awarded to age – group winners in the 5k, 10k and Fun Run.  Also, both the 5k and the 10k are USATF certified courses and chip timed! Race entry fee includes a full color dry-tec T-shirt, refreshments and tickets for prize baskets. 


Monday, April 14, 2014

Eickhoff's Extra's: Patient Questions



Patients often ask what is more important, diet or exercise, to ease knee arthritis pain in overweight individuals.    A recent 18 month study showed that patients who decreased calorie intake and exercised had better improvement in knee pain then patients who just dieted or exercised alone. 


Jennifer Eickhoff, FNP-BC, MSN, ATC, LAT 

Disclaimer:
There is a fine line between blogging and giving medical advice. The content of this blog is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as medical advice.  Nothing contained in this blog is intended to replace the medical advice of a trained, licensed physician.
In all matters relating to your health, you are urged to consult a physician. You can contact Advanced Bone & Joint to set up a formal consultation appointment with Dr. W. Anthony Frisella, Dr. Dane Glueck, Dr. Brandon Larkin, Dr. Anthony Lombardo, Dr. John McAllister, II, Dr. Brian Meek, Dr. Paul Spezia, Jennifer Eickhoff, FNP-BC, or Matt Pliske, PA-C

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

from the Doctor's Desk: What is a partial knee replacement?



What is a partial knee replacement?
How is it different from a total knee replacement?

 A partial knee replacement means that rather than replacing all of the knee’s joint surfaces, we replace only the area that is affected by arthritis.  It’s useful to understand that a joint replacement is really a resurfacing of the joint in the area that is worn down (the cartilage is thin and there is a loss of padding and smooth surface between the bones).  The worn cartilage and a relatively thin layer of bone are replaced with metal and a hard plastic spacer.
Image from AAOS website

The most common partial knee replacement is a unicondylar (unicompartmental) replacement where the inner (medial) portion of the knee is replaced.  In the procedure the outer (lateral) portion of the knee and the kneecap joint area are not replaced.  In addition, the internal ligaments are also left in place.  Less commonly performed is a patellofemoral replacement (kneecap joint).  In this procedure the inner and outer portions of the knee and the internal ligaments are left alone and only the kneecap area replaced.

The best candidates for partial knee replacement are those with arthritis and pain that’s relatively localized to one region of the knee.  If arthritic changes are much more widespread, then a total knee replacement is a better option.  With a partial knee replacement there is a chance for progression of knee arthritis in the rest of the knee that could require a conversion to a total knee replacement.  However, with good patient selection, many partial knee replacements are working well for patients for 15 years or more.

Image from AAOS website
The benefits of a partial knee replacement typically include a faster and less painful recovery and a knee that may feel “more normal” than one with a total knee replacement.  For example, many partial knee replacements only need one night in the hospital versus two with a total knee replacement.  There is a growing trend to perform partial knee replacements given their overall good outcomes in the right patients.

Dane Glueck, MD – April 2014