Friday, June 28, 2013

Tailor’s Bunion (Bunionette)






What Is a Tailor’s Bunion?
Tailor’s bunion is, also called a bunionette, is an enlargement of the fifth metatarsal bone at the base of the little toe. The metatarsals are the five long bones of the foot. The enlargement that characterizes the tailor’s bunion occurs at the metatarsal “head,” located at the far end of the bone where it meets the toe. Tailor’s bunions are not as common as bunions, which occur on the inside of the foot, but both are similar in symptoms and causes.
            The symptoms of tailor’s bunions include redness, swelling, and pain at the site of the enlargement. These symptoms occur when wearing shoes that rub against the enlargement, irritating the soft tissues underneath the skin and producing inflammation.

Causes of a Tailor’s Bunion
Often tailor’s bunion is caused by an inherited faulty mechanical structure of the foot. IN these cases, changes occur in the foot’s bony framework that result in the development of an enlargement. The fifth metatarsal bone starts to protrude outward, while the little toe moves inward. This shift creates a bump on the outside of the foot that becomes irritated whenever a shoe presses against it.
            Sometimes a tailor’s bunion is actually a bony spur (an outgrowth of bone) on the side of the fifth metatarsal head. Heredity is the main reason that these spurs develop.
            Regardless of the cause, the symptoms of a tailor’s bunion are usually aggravated by wearing shoes that are too narrow in the toe, producing constant rubbing and pressure. In fact, wearing shoes with a tight toe box can make the deformity get progressively worse.

Diagnosis
Tailor’s bunion is easily diagnosed because the protrusion is visually apparent. X-rays may be ordered to help the doctor determine the cause and extent of the deformity.

Treatment:
Non-Surgical Options
Treatment for tailor’s bunion typically begins with non-surgical therapies. Your doctor may select one or more of the following options:
·         Shoe modifications. Wearing the right kind of shoes is critical. Chose shoes that have a wide toe box, and avoid those with pointed toes or heels.
·         Oral medications. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID’s), such as ibuprofen, may help relieve the pain and inflammation.
·         Injection therapy. Injections of corticosteroid are commonly used to treat the inflamed tissue around the joint.

When Is Surgery Needed?
Surgery is often considered when pain continues despite the above approaches. Surgery is highly successful in the treatment of tailor’s bunions.
            In selecting the procedure or combination of procedures for your particular case, the doctor will take into consideration the extent of your deformity based on the x-ray findings, your age, your activity level, and other factors. The length of the recovery period will vary, depending on the procedure or procedures performed.

Disclaimer:
There is a fine line between blogging and giving medical advice. The content of this blog is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as medical advice.  Nothing contained in this blog is intended to replace the medical advice of a trained, licensed physician.
In all matters relating to your health, you are urged to consult a physician. You can contact Advanced Bone & Joint to set up a formal consultation appointment with Dr. W. Anthony Frisella, Dr. Dane Glueck, Dr. Brandon Larkin, Dr. Anthony Lombardo, Dr. John McAllister, II, Dr. Brian Meek, Dr. Paul Spezia, Jennifer Eickhoff, FNP-BC, or Matt Pliske, PA-C

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Wellness Wednesday / "Delia's Dose"



This week I am inspired by one of my favorite summertime foods..AVOCADOS!! Did you know they are sometimes referred to as “alligator pears” and are actually a fruit?!
They are considered one of the most beneficial foods on the planet! They contain over 25 essential nutrients: Vitamins A, B, C, E, K, copper, iron, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, fiber, and protein, just to name a few!

You may have heard that avocados are high in fat…yes, but the GOOD kind of fat, the monounsaturated kind. You should be eating more of those fats and less of the saturated and trans fats. Our bodies do need fat…just not the kind most Americans consume on a regular basis! Fat provides energy. If we don’t expend a lot of energy then that fat gets stored....and I don’t have to tell ya where!  So, once again…fat is good for us…the good fats(mono and poly)…but in moderation!  

Here’s just a few reasons why avocado is so good for you:

*avocado oil has been known to help in treating psoriasis-a skin disease that causes skin redness and irritation
*studies have shown that extracts from avocados were able to kill some oral cancer cells and prevented pre-cancerous cells from developing
*it is high in oleic acid, which has shown to prevent breast cancer, help with blood flow, and inhibit the growth of prostate cancer
*they have more lutien than most fruits, which helps protect against macular degeneration and cataracts
*it is high in beta-sitosterol, which helps lower cholesterol levels
*it is high in folate, which help lower your risk for heart disease, stroke, and helps to prevent certain birth defects.
*very rich in antioxidants like glutathione, which helps boost your immune system and slows aging.
*great source of potassium (more than a banana) which can help in controlling high blood pressure.
*the good fats help our body absorb nutrients like beta-carotene and lycopene. So if you add avocado to your salad that has carrots and tomatoes on it, you would get even MORE nutrients!

Here’s a delicious summer salad to try! (from one of my favorite websites www.paleoplan.com)
*3 tbs fresh lime juice
*4 tsp honey
*2 tbs olive oil
*1/2 tsp sea salt
*1 cantaloupe(about 3lbs), quartered and seeded
*1 avocado
*1 cup cherry or grape tomatoes, halved

1.       In a large bowl, whisk together the lime juice, honey, oil and salt…set aside.
2.       Cut each cantaloupe quarter in half lengthwise. Run a knife between the flesh and skin of the melon, discard skin.

Slice each wedge lengthwise into ½ inch pieces.
3.       Cut each avocado in quarters length-wise and then into ½ inch thick slices. Add the cantaloupe, avocado, and tomatoes to the bowl with the dressing and toss to coat.

ENJOY!
Have a Healthy Week!
-Delia
DISCLAIMER: Delia is not a Doctor, Nutritionist, or Registered Dietitian. She is simply a person dedicated to eating healthy foods and living a healthy lifestyle. She loves to help and inspire others to do the same!
 
(for the record, I have been known to rub the inside of the avocado peel on my skin..I know…crazy right?!…but there are hidden oils in the peel that have anti aging benefits and moisturizers!  After you scoop out all the delicious avocado, gently rub the inside of the peel on those spots where you don’t want lines…you can leave it on overnight and wash your face in the morning..no kidding!)

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Heel Pain (Plantar Fasciitis)



 
Heel pain is most often caused by plantar fasciitis—a condition that is sometimes also called heel spur syndrome when a spur is present. Heel pain may also be due to other causes, such as stress fracture, tendonitis, arthritis, nerve irritation, or, rarely, a cyst.
            
 Because there are several potential causes, it is important to have heel pain properly diagnosed.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?
Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the band of tissue (the plantar fascia) that extends from the heel to the toes. In this condition, the fascia first becomes irritated and then inflamed—resulting in the heel pain. The symptoms of plantar fasciitis:
·         Pain on the bottom of the heel
·         Pain that is usually worse upon arising
·         Pain that increases over a period of months

People with plantar fasciitis often describe the pain as worse when they get up in the morning or after they have been sitting for long periods of time. After a few minutes of walking the pain decreases because walking stretches the fascia. For some people the pain subsides but returns after spending long periods of time on their feet.

Causes of Plantar Fasciitis
The most common cause of plantar fasciitis relates to faulty structure of the foot. For example, people who have problems with their arches—either overly flat feet or high-arched feet—are more prone to developing plantar fasciitis.        
            Wearing non-supportive footwear on hard, flat surfaces puts abnormal strain on the plantar fascia and can also lead to plantar fasciitis. This is particularly evident when a person’s job requires long hours on their feet. Obesity also contributes to plantar fasciitis.

Diagnosis
The arrive at a diagnosis, your foot and ankle surgeon will obtain your medical history and examine your foot. Throughout this process the surgeon rules out all possible causes for your heal pain other than plantar fasciitis.
            In addition, diagnostic imaging studies such as x-rays, a bone scan, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be used to distinguish the different types of heel pain. Sometimes heel spurs are found in patients with plantar fasciitis, but these are rarely a source of pain. When they are present, the condition may be diagnosed as plantar fasciitis/heel spur syndrome.

Treatment Options
The treatment of plantar fasciitis begins with first-line strategies, which you can begin at home:
·         Stretching exercises. Exercises that stretch out the calk muscles help ease pain and assist with recovery.
·         Avoid going barefoot. When you walk without shoes, you put undue strain and stress on your plantar fascia.
·         Ice. Putting an ice pack on your heel for 10 minutes several times a day helps to reduce inflammation.
·         Limit activities. Cut down on extended physical activities to give your heel a rest.
·         Medications. Nonsteroidal inflammatory drugs (NSAID’s), such as ibuprofen, may help reduce pain and inflammation.
·         Lose weight. Extra pounds put extra stress on your plantar fascia.
·         Padding and strapping. Placing pads in the shoe softens the impact of walking. Strapping helps support he foot and reduce strain on the fascia.
·         Orthotic devices. Custom orthotic devices that fit into your shoe help correct the underlying structural abnormalities causing the plantar fasciitis.
·         Injection therapy. In some cases, corticosteroid injections are used to help reduce the inflammation and relieve pain.
·         Removable walking cast. A removable walking cast may be used to keep your foot immobile for a few weeks to allow it to rest and heal.
·         Night splint. Wearing a night splint allows you to maintain an extended stretch of the plantar fascia while sleeping. This may help reduce the morning pain experienced by some patients.
·         Physical therapy. Exercises and other physical therapy measures may be used to help provide relief.

Although most patients with plantar fasciitis respond to non-surgical treatment, a small percentage of patients may require surgery. If, after several months of non-surgical treatment, you continue to have heel pain, surgery will be considered. Your foot and ankle surgeon will discuss the surgical options with you and determine which approach would be most beneficial for you.

Long-term Care
No matter what kind of treatment you undergo for plantar fasciitis, the underlying causes that led to this condition may remain. Therefore, you will need to continue with preventative measures. If you are overweight, it is important to reach and maintain an ideal weight. For all patients, wearing supportive shoes and using custom orthotic devices are the mainstay of long-term treatment for plantar fasciitis.

Disclaimer:
There is a fine line between blogging and giving medical advice. The content of this blog is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as medical advice.  Nothing contained in this blog is intended to replace the medical advice of a trained, licensed physician.
In all matters relating to your health, you are urged to consult a physician. You can contact Advanced Bone & Joint to set up a formal consultation appointment with Dr. W. Anthony Frisella, Dr. Dane Glueck, Dr. Brandon Larkin, Dr. Anthony Lombardo, Dr. John McAllister, II, Dr. Brian Meek, Dr. Paul Spezia, Jennifer Eickhoff, FNP-BC, or Matt Pliske, PA-C

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

Wellness Wednesday / "Delia's Dose"




This week’s blog is inspired by a co worker of mine asking me what I think of that very famous sports drink…the one that was born when a Florida assistant coach asked a team of physicians to find out why his players suffered so much from heat related illnesses. It is the official sports drink of Major League Baseball, the NBA, and the NFL, to name a few.

The ingredients of this very hydrating drink include: water, high fructose corn syrup, sucrose syrup, citric acid, natural flavor, salt, sodium citrate, monopotassium phosphate, modified food starch, red 40 and glycerol ester of rosin.

There’s that darn High Fructose Corn Syrup(HFCS) again…it is cheaper for manufacturers to make than plain old sugar and it is used to sweeten and preserve many many many of the foods and beverages that people eat. It is made up of fructose, the sugar that is found in fruit, and glucose, which comes from the corn. There’s nothing wrong with fructose…if you are getting it the natural way, from fruits, the fiber in the fruit helps to slow down the absorption of the sugar in your body. Since HFCS is not natural, your body doesn’t really know what to do with it. So instead of going through the pancreas to process sugar, it goes straight to your liver…which basically then turns it to fat and then your body stores it. HFCS has been in our food and drinks since the 1980’s….hmmmm, interesting that the obesity epidemic and diabetes rates have skyrocketed since the 1980’s isn’t it? Here’s how I understand the real danger of HFCS: it prevents your body from getting that feeling of fullness…it’s like your stomach and your brain don’t communicate anymore because they are in a HFCS fog! Over eating=bigger waist line=more health problems! HFCS also causes a sugar high then a sugar low….it’s a cycle that just keeps repeating itself, as long as you keep eating and drinking things with HFCS in it….and if that cycle repeats enough, it can lead to diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity!

Natural Flavor: Ok, what exactly is that? The FDA(Food and Drug Administration) defines it as: “any substance that is extracted, distilled or otherwise derived from plant or animal matter. It may be produced either directly from the matter itself, or after it has been roasted, heated or fermented.”  Now, IF the “flavor” comes from one source, like an apple…they can put on the label, “apple flavor, natural.” If the flavor comes from many sources it has to say, “apple flavor WONF (with other natural flavors).” Ok, I am confused….so apparently under the FDA regulations…a company could use beef to flavor chicken soup and only have to list on the ingredients label, “natural flavors.”  Hmmmm…

Modified Food Starch: is a CHEMICALLY ALTERED ingredient made from starch. It can be made from corn, potato, tapioca, rice or wheat. It is made by either treating it with acid, roasting it, treating it with sodium hydroxide(a chemical used for making cleaning and paper products)…you know how I feel about FAKE foods…and for me, the key word here is…MODIFIED, which by definition means to “change the form or qualities of; to alter”…start reading those food labels and notice how much MODIFIED stuff you are eating!
Glycerol Ester of Rosin: this is a food additive used as an emulsifier(molecules with a water-loving and an oil-loving end, used to help bind substances together)which basically keeps oils suspended in water.  We all know that oil and water don’t mix…so when flavoring oils are added to a water-based beverage, the oil would just float on top. Wood rosin, which by definition is “the powder remaining after the distillation of wood turpentine.” Some types are extracted with petroleum solvents and come from the stumps of trees. Mixed with other ingredients to form what they call ester gum. Then that is combined with glycerol(a colorless, odorless naturally occurring chemical) and mixed in with the soon to be hydrating sports beverage.

Now, this sports drink does have things in it that help keep you hydrated and keep athletes from having muscle fatigue. It’s just all the other ingredients that I don’t like! Again, this is something I say drink in moderation…as it does contain a lot of sugar and other FAKE ingredients. It is formulated specifically for endurance athletes, remember that. If you are not a true athlete, I say just drink a lot of water(remember, take your current body weight and divide that by 2 to get the amount of ounces of water you should be drinking every day!)…add a squeeze of lemon(citric acid) and a dash of salt for hydration!!

Have a healthy week!
-DELIA
DISCLAIMER: Delia is not a Doctor, Nutritionist, or Registered Dietitian. She is simply a person dedicated to eating healthy foods and living a healthy lifestyle. She loves to help and inspire others to do the same!